Cold Frame Countdown

Summer is nearly here, and the cold frames are at maximum production:

Working Cold Frames, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

We’ve built three cold frames so far this year.  The first was built and sown in February with radishes, lettuce, onions, and carrots.  The second two were constructed in April, and were sown at the new moon with a) corn and sunflowers; b) spinach, arugula, cilantro, snap peas, and marjoram.

First Cold Frame: Radish Cornucopia, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

I’ve learned to incorporate radishes into more dishes than I ever imagined possible – nothing like a healthy radish surplus to help you get creative.  The spinach and arugula are now vigorous enough that I can pick leaves each day and they are replenished by the following evening.  The lettuce seems a little slow-moving, but that doesn’t worry me: there’s plenty more on the way!  Now that the cold frames are built, we will have a leg-up for winter and spring.  I’ll begin planting them around August to secure fresh vegetables long past the typical growing months.

Spinach and Arugula Cold Frame, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

Another added benefit of cold frames: they are bunny and deer proof (unless, of course, you have some REALLY determined bunnies).  I’ve been keeping the corn-and-sunflowers cold frame closed most days and all nights to keep things really warm for vigorous growth; the other two cold frames have been spending all days open, and temperate nights too.  This is important because keeping them too warm would cause the spinach, radishes, arugula, cilantro, and others to “bolt” to flowers.

Corn and Sunflowers Cold Frame, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

As you can see in these images, our sunflowers are just about ready for transplanting, and the corn will definitely be “knee-high by the fourth of July”.  In fact, these pictures were taken a week ago, and today everything has doubled from what’s shown here.  While it’s true that corn is one of many vegetables which does best when direct-sown, I chose this approach to help the plants along until the ground warms enough for planting.  The plan for the corn is two-fold: some of them will relocate to a new west-facing garden area currently being prepped, and others will be tested with the three sisters method when I plant the pumpkins and melons.

Sunflowers and Corn Sprouts, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

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Spring Plant Starts

Spring Plant Starts, © Copyright 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

A quick peek ahead at what’s to come at AppleJade: here you can see my plant starts enjoying a little sunshine outdoors thanks to this nice, warm weekend. Not pictured here are the cold frames under construction. I am preparing some step-by-step instructions to help you build your own. More soon!

Snow-Gardens

Snowed-In Vegetable Garden, © Copyright 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

Greetings from snowy, cloudy Washington!  As I’m sure you concluded by my disappearance, I had very little time for gardening or blogging during the second half of 2008.  Fortunately, I returned home to Washington just in time to see four feet of snow fall!  We have enjoyed a beautiful kickoff to winter, and now that I know I’m home to stay I can begin preparations for spring.

The garden, as you can see, has been under a heavy snow blanket.  That snow provides excellent insulation, and beneath it the strawberries and herbs are all healthy and green.  Preparations are underway for a) green houses, b) cold frames, c) indoor vegetable starts, and d) direct-sowing of cold crops.  I look forward to sharing my garden adventures with you in the coming year, and invite you to join me as I pursue a self-sustaining lifestyle here in the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

May we all enjoy a healthy, productive, and “green” year!

Sun-Gardens

Greetings from sunny, southern California!  Blogging will be light until the autumn while I travel, but I will be sure to stop in from time to time and share garden finds and recipes.

Later this year we’ll check back in on the Kitsap garden and see what comes up!

Raw Potential

Gardening can benefit from a healthy combination of vision, creativity, and random surprise.  For me, gardening serves the dual purpose of helping me to discover things about myself while I slowly learn about the green world.  This summer I have been extracting my garden from weeds and tree sprouts.  In these pictures you can see what I’ve uncovered so far.  It may not look like much, but all I see is endless potential!

 

 

 

 

 

The strawberry harvest was excellent.  This small patch yielded about 2-3 cups of fruit for 3-4 weeks (making for some delicious, vitamin-packed margaritas!).  In a few more weeks the blackberries will begin to ripen, and I’m confident that I’ll have enough for pies and freezing.  I will relocate a few plants to increase my yields next year.

 

  

The herbs bring back a strong sense of nostalgia as they work their way back into my meals.  Certain herbs and spices remind me of places I have lived (and grown) or visited.  Lemon rosemary reminds me of Kitsap, Washington.  Greek oregano will probably always remind me of Chester County, PA.  I have already taken cuttings of the herbs so that they too can be relocated around the property.  I also found time to plant a couple tomatoes and an Anaheim chili pepper – I’ll show you what they’re doing next week.

 

While the wild plants had to be removed to make room for planted vegetables, I’ve made sure to leave many in place.  These wildflowers are an important attractant for bees and butterflies (and besides that, I like them).  The rest of the garden is slowly being cultivated into soft, open beds like the one you see here.  This is where I will be sowing seeds for cold-hearty plants which will likely survive the temperate Washington winter even outside of the coldframe.

 

 

 

 

 

And speaking of cold frames, now that we have completed new gates for the garden, cold frames are the new weekend projects.  Stay tuned for diagrams, pictures, and step-by-step instructions for you to build you own cold frame in time for autumn and winter planting!

Forest Garden

Wild Daisies, © Copyright 2008 Jade Leone Blackwater

Our garden in Kitsap is a forest garden by nature (no pun intended).  Despite our three year absence in Philadelphia, our vegetable garden nestled in the Kitsap forests has persisted with chives, onions, thyme, mints, rosemary, strawberries, and other assorted flowers and herbs.  Thanks to the temperate Western Washington weather, these plants have patiently grown year-round without any tending from me.

In between my work I take every chance I can find to get out in the garden and extract the “garden plants” from the “weeds.”  Here in the forest, hemlocks and alders seed themselves readily among the vegetables.  I’ve been fortunate to find that several wild herbs I like have incorporated themselves into the beds including sorrel, red clover, and dandelion.

This July I will be sharing the view from my forest garden as I revitalize my own local food source.  I am in the process of reestablishing the beds in order to sow greens, late tomato starts, and herbs.  We will be building new cold frames, which will be a great opportunity for me to show you some step-by-step instructions for how we build ours from what materials we have available.  Finally, time permitting I will be sharing some simple ideas for drying, storing, and using herbs.

Green Blogging from the Evergreen State

Pink Columbine, May 2008, © Copyright 2008 Jade Leone Blackwater

Greetings from the Emerald City!  I am settling in to the Pacific Northwest after enjoying a most excellent roadtrip from Philadelphia to Seattle.  I will resume blogging in June with a post frequency of 1 – 2 times per week on each blog: AppleJade, Arboreality, and Brainripples.

At AppleJade we will be discussing healthy, happy lifestyle through attitude, gardening, cooking, and simple, green living.

At Arboreality we will be exploring the woods of Western Washington and other localities within reasonable driving distance.

At Brainripples we will be sharing methods of creative exploration, successful approaches to working independently, and unique perspectives from featured artists.

You will also find me blogging at the Pennwriters Area 6 HQ, a new blog created as a resource for writers living in and around southeastern Pennsylvania.  I will be blogging with other Pennwriters about local news, events, information, and of course – writers!

If you are a writer in the Puget Sound Area (Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, Kitsap Peninsula, Bellingham) and would like to join my newly forming Seattle Pennwriters Critique Groups, please contact me for more information.

More to follow!

PS – Today’s image is of the columbine flowers still growing happily in my Washington gardens.

PPS – Please bear with me as I acclimate to the new WordPress interface, and please let me know when things don’t look *quite right*.