Snow-Gardens

Snowed-In Vegetable Garden, © Copyright 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

Greetings from snowy, cloudy Washington!  As I’m sure you concluded by my disappearance, I had very little time for gardening or blogging during the second half of 2008.  Fortunately, I returned home to Washington just in time to see four feet of snow fall!  We have enjoyed a beautiful kickoff to winter, and now that I know I’m home to stay I can begin preparations for spring.

The garden, as you can see, has been under a heavy snow blanket.  That snow provides excellent insulation, and beneath it the strawberries and herbs are all healthy and green.  Preparations are underway for a) green houses, b) cold frames, c) indoor vegetable starts, and d) direct-sowing of cold crops.  I look forward to sharing my garden adventures with you in the coming year, and invite you to join me as I pursue a self-sustaining lifestyle here in the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

May we all enjoy a healthy, productive, and “green” year!

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Through sleet and snow the plants still grow

Onions in Sleet, (c) 2007 Jade Leone Blackwater

 

Philadelphia had a cold weekend, and here in Chester County we saw bits of sleet, snow, and freezing rain.  Our temperatures remained around 30 degrees (Fahrenheit) on Sunday, but our plants stayed cozy in the cold frame.

We have a small patch of onions in the main garden which I transferred from the coldframe in early Autumn.  Unfortunately, I never had a chance to build them a little row cover.  This year they are part of my experiment to see what will happen to the onions as we see months of cold, dry weather, and occasional snowfall.  My guess is, they may get a little mad and droopy, but they’ll survive just fine.

Cold Frame in Sleet, (c) Copyright 2007 Jade Leone Blackwater

Meanwhile… in the coldframe the greens are cozy and happy, protected from wind and extreme cold.  I didn’t open the cold frame at all over the weekend, so as not to release the bit of warmth trapped inside.  The picture above shows the mizuna mustard greens pressed up against the cold frame, protected from the bitter cold. (Remember you can click on pictures to enlarge them).

We’ve had a lot of questions about how to build and use a cold frame.  In addition to our health discussions this December at AppleJade, I will be drafting up some simple steps for you to construct and use your own cold frame (although that may not be posted until January).

And don’t worry – even if it’s too cold for you to sow your seeds now, you can still make use of your cold frame in the coming spring (and next autumn/winter, of course).  A small amount of planning can dramatically improve the results of your gardening efforts – big or small!

PS – If you’re looking for a little inspiration today, hop over to my Brainripples blog.  Each week I offer the Monday Morning Muse featuring photography to help spark the creative!  Also, the Festival of the Trees 18 – November Arborea is now online at Riverside Rambles, composed by Larry Ayers.  The Festival of the Trees is a monthly blog carnival featuring posts about trees and forests from around the blogosphere – talk about inspiration!